Saturday, September 06, 2008

House full

The music season of Chennai has always generated a 'fever of excitement' that is not found in the other months. Though music festivals are held in all parts of the world, Chennai, the Hollywood of music stands unparalleled for sheer numbers and enthusiasm.

Naturally, season's tickets for the programmes get sold out even before the rasikas know about the artistes, the singer/accompanist combinations, and so on. In addition, members are given concessional rates and naturally, avail of this opportunity.



In this situation, the number of daily tickets being sold is limited. Many rasikas seeking to attend that day's concert have to go back without getting a ticket.

However, on entering the hall, one is surprised to see that there are still quite a few vacant seats. This is because of the non-attendance of some of the season's ticket holders or members for some reason or other.

On one hand, many rasikas are deprived of a daily ticket. On the other hand, there are still seats vacant in the hall. How to solve this problem?

The solution seems to lie in reserving the admission of the season's ticket holders and members.

Just as a passenger boarding a flight has to check-in at least an hour in advance, or a train traveler at least 30 seconds before the departure, it may be made mandatory for such a ticket holder to report on time, or with a minimum grace time of say, 5 minutes. Failing which, his seat could be sold as a daily ticket.

Such an arrangement will allow genuine rasikas to listen to their favourites without disappointment and in addition, prove an encouragement for artistes who can sing to a really full hall instead of one that merely bears the sign 'Sold out'.

Friday, September 05, 2008

Hypocrites



It is a well known fact that a master in his chosen field is held in great esteem by the public. This applies to musicians as well as other famous personalities. The image he carries is spotless, making him a role model for others to emulate.
However, when such people interact with others in, say, lectures, speeches, discussions, interviews, etc. , they sometimes betray facts about their characters that are anything but admirable. This reveals their true nature and is a proof that what they have been projecting to the public is nothing but a drama.
Truth always comes out in the end.
It would be in the interests of these celebrated personalities to genuinely be what they show to the world. Otherwise, they will not only be displaying their weaknesses to the public, but also the fact that their behaviour is hypocritical.

Future of music- Promise or compromise?

Music has been described as the food of life. Sabhas play a central role in feeding the rasikas with this fine art. They organize concerts, jugalbandhis, and fusion ensembles with the aim of giving quality music without compromising the dignity of the art. The comfortable ambience of the Sabhas provides an ideal environment for listening as well as performing.
In recent times the phenomenon of Event Managed programmes has set in. Though many of these provide excellent fare, the general trend seems to be far from welcome. The scene is generally as follows:



Music has been described as the food of life. Sabhas play a central role in feeding the rasikas with this fine art. They organize concerts, jugalbandhis, and fusion ensembles with the aim of giving quality music without compromising the dignity of the art. The comfortable ambience of the Sabhas provides an ideal environment for listening as well as performing.
In recent times the phenomenon of Event Managed programmes has set in. Though many of these provide excellent fare, the general trend seems to be far from welcome. The scene is generally as follows:

Social evenings are organized by event management companies in hotels and bungalows on city outskirts. Music programmes are arranged as part of the entertainment. The general aim of these get-togethers is to provide fun. Liquor is served freely. Cigarette smoke fills the air. Dancing and swimming go on in full swing to the accompaniment of the shrieks of happy children in the play area.
The musicians play on in this ambience. Such evenings are organized for executives and foreign delegates as a means of relaxation.
What an irony! On one hand Sabhas are striving hard to nurture music in all its grandeur, in a dignified atmosphere. On the other hand such event managed programmes take place in an atmosphere of vice giving a wrong impression to the executives and foreigner delegates for whom, caught up in their busy schedules, this may be the only exposure they have to our music.
Who is to blame for this state of affair? Is it the host of these parties? Or the event management companies who benefit hugely but throw bread crumbs at the eagerly accepting musicians? Or is it the musicians themselves who, unwilling to slog their way up the ladder prefer the easy path of money making by participating in such tamashas, and thus compromise their art?
Only two solutions to solve this problem.
One, let the concert take place in a clean ambience and the partying begin later.
Or better still, let the event management companies keep our music out of such affairs altogether. Like oil and water, vice and music do not mix. After all, pleasure has many varieties. Haven’t we all seen the joyful expression on the film villain enjoying the aftermath of his ‘deed’ as he sits surrounded by various ‘diversions’?